Malala speaks out against Boko Haram in Nigeria

Published: July 20, 2017 09:43:37 | Updated: October 22, 2017 19:39:27


Malala visited internally displaced camps in and around the city of Maiduguri, where thousands have sheltered from Boko Haram's violence

Malala Yousafzai was greeted with cheers by dozens of young women in northeastern Nigeria, where she spoke out for the many girls abducted under Boko Haram's deadly insurgency.

 

The 20-year-old Pakistani activist said on Tuesday she was excited by the courage of the young women who are undaunted as they pursue an education amid one of the world's worst humanitarian crises.

 

The Nobel Peace laureate, who also met with the freed Chibok schoolgirls taken in a mass abduction by Boko Haram more than three years ago, said, "This is part of my girl power trip, visiting many parts of the world."

 

"I am here now because of the Nigerian girls. Fighting for them and speaking up for them," she said.

 

Yousafzai visited internally displaced camps in and around the city of Maiduguri, where thousands have sheltered from Boko Haram's violence. The extremist group continues to carry out deadly attacks there, often using young female suicide bombers.

 

"They have lived in the period of extremism," Yousafzai said of the young women around her. Many have seen family members killed.

 

Yousafzai was 15 when she shot in the head by Taliban militants in 2012, targeted due to her advocacy for women's education.

 

The Nobel winner said her Nigeria visit was significant because it was the partial fulfillment of what she advocated the last time she was there.

 

In 2014, she pressed then-President Goodluck Jonathan to ensure the rescue of the more than 200 abducted Chibok schoolgirls.

 

On Monday, Yousafzai met with more than 100 who have since been rescued and now stay in the capital, Abuja, for what the government calls rehabilitation.

 

Many others remain in Boko Haram captivity, "and the government must unite so that they should make sure that these girls are released," Yousafzai said.

 

"Boko Haram themselves should learn that in Islam, such things are unacceptable," she added. "This is against humanity, this is against Islam."

 

UNICEF's country representative Mohamed Malick Fall said Yousafzai's visit is a symbol of hope, and "we will do everything in our power to make sure all children can keep learning," according to AP.

Share if you like